What Is Legally Blind in Contacts

What Is Legally Blind in Contacts

The definition of legal blindness is used as a guideline to enable these individuals to receive government assistance, such as social security disability benefits. Similarly, the Department of Motor Vehicles has established this recipe as the line in which it is no longer safe for you to drive. Basically, if it`s at least 20/70, can`t be corrected — even with touches, glasses, or surgery — and interferes with your daily activities, it can legally be considered a “visual impairment.” The most common eye diseases that lead to blindness include diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and cataracts. Detected early, steps can be taken to slow the progression of these diseases, and in the case of cataracts, surgery can permanently correct the problem. If a person with 20/200 vision is legally blind, their field of vision is less than 20 degrees. To be legally blind, you must have a visual acuity of 20/200. This means that even with glasses or contact lenses, you can only read the first letter at the top of the Snellen diagram, if at all. You can also be legally blind if you can see, but only in a very small window in your eye. Essentially, even if you can see, if you can`t see enough to function regularly, you can probably be considered legally blind.

If you`re not completely blind yet, but your vision isn`t what it used to be, you probably fall into the category of visually impaired adults. Visual impairment is sometimes referred to as “partial blindness”, but because the term is not necessarily accurate, “visual impairment” is preferred. You may be surprised to learn that it is Uncle Sam, not the doctor, who determines whether you are legally blind. According to the American Foundation for the Blind, legally blind is not the same as completely blind, which is used to describe the inability to see anything with both eyes. Most people who are legally blind have some eyesight. Blind people are “legally blind,” but some people who can see with strong eyeglasses say they are legally blind without their glasses. This means that without glasses, they might not see well enough to see certain things, drive, etc. Visual acuity below 20/200 is considered blind under the law, but to truly fit the definition, the person must not be able to achieve 20/200 vision, even with prescription glasses. Many people who would be legally blind without glasses can function well in everyday life with proper glasses or contact lenses. In most states, drivers must have 20/40 vision or better for an unrestricted driver`s license.

If you wear glasses or contact lenses, your corrected vision should be at least 20/40. Your eye doctor may perform a comprehensive eye exam to determine if you are considered legally blind. If you wear contact lenses or glasses, your vision will also be measured when you wear these corrective lenses. To be legally blind, your vision must be 20/200 or worse when you wear your lenses, or you must meet the visual field criteria. Your doctor must also be able to prove that this condition has existed for 12 months or more, or that it is likely to persist for at least 12 months. In other words, a person who is legally blind can see an object from a distance of 20 feet that a person with normal vision could see from 200 feet away. If you have a Snellen rating above 20/70, with and without contact lenses or glasses, you have relatively good vision and are not legally blind or even legally visually impaired. If you are completely blind, you cannot see any light or shape. If you`re legally blind like 1.3 million people in the United States, you can still see — but not as clearly. Normal (average) vision is 20/20. This means that you can see a 20-foot object clearly what others can see at 20 feet.

If you are legally blind, your vision is 20/200 or less in your eye that sees better. That is, if an object is 200 feet away, you need to stand 20 feet away from it to see it clearly, but a person with normal vision can stand 200 feet away and see that object perfectly. Certain conditions, such as glaucoma, cataracts, and diabetes, can affect your vision to such an extent that you can be diagnosed as legally blind. Legal blindness is determined when you wear your last prescription for glasses. There is no such thing as legal blindness “with glasses removed”. There is also no legal blindness in one eye. Legal blindness, by definition, is based on the best corrected visual acuity of the eye that sees better.